Archive for June, 2009

Click Click “Is It Real?” & “I Rage I Melt”

Posted in music with tags , , , on June 22, 2009 by cromagnonwoman
Click Click "Is This It?"
Click Click | Bent Massive LP | Play It Again Sam | 1989

Click Click "I Rage I Melt"
Click Click | I Rage I Melt EP | Play It Again Sam | 1987

When one thinks of 80’s-90’s Industrial acts, kids these days might call to mind Skinny Puppy or Ministry but mention Click Click and they’ll probably pretend to know what you’re talking about and then go straight home to ask the internets. I think this is a crying shame.

Click Click were formed in 1982 by Adrian Smith and Derek E. Smith, brothers with an apparently volatile relationship that might possibly have been further hindered by drug use, the over-consumption of tea, and a synthesizer called a WASP. Like those more name-dropped bands, they used tape loops, childrens toys, radio and television manipulation, and other decidedly analog methods to make their signature sound. They cite Cabaret Voltaire, Can, and Captain Beefheart as influences so you do the math.

They are reportedly releasing their back catalog in downloadable formats, but that was in 2008 and a cursory search of the web doesn’t show a lot of Click Click to be had. To remedy this travesty, here are two Click Click tracks for the delight of your ear balls. The first is “Is This It?” from their Bent Massive LP, released in 1989. The second is “I Rage I Melt” from their EP of the same title, from 1987:

LISTEN: Mediafire
LISTEN: Mediafire

Die Form “Poupee Mecanique”

Posted in music with tags , , , , on June 12, 2009 by cromagnonwoman
Die Form "Poupee Mecanique"
Die Form | Poupee Mecanique LP | Bain Total | 1987

The Slug and I were careening through the back woods today when, through some convoluted wormhole of conversation, we wound up talking about this great record store in Pittsburgh called Eides. The memory of the hours spent in there, combing through their offerings, immediately called to mind a record I’d purchased there on a trip to the Pitt in 1998. At the time, I found it difficult to navigate the aisles with the stadium’s worth of tulle I regularly wore but, somehow, I managed well enough to find Die Form’s “Poupee Mecanique” LP, its naughty lady bits calling to me from the Industrial bin.

I recall being slightly scandalized and titillated by the album artwork and more than a little intrigued by the content of Die Form songs, namely the unmistakable fetish imagery. What went on in Philippe Fichot’s bedroom? I couldn’t help but wonder as I played this album over and over again to my own delight and my roommate’s chagrin. The electronic musical experiments, the childlike melodies and playful female vocals, the slightly sinister content, and the overwhelming feeling that what I possessed was culled from some sweat- and semen-soaked, underground art scene forever solidified “Poupee Mecanique” as my favorite Die Form album.

Here is the title track, from the original release of the album on Bain Total, Die Form’s own label.

LISTEN: Mediafire

Danielle Dax “Here Come The Harvest Buns”

Posted in music with tags , , , , on June 10, 2009 by cromagnonwoman
Danielle Dax "Here Come The Harvest Buns"
Danielle Dax | Pop-Eyes LP | Awesome Records | 1985

I should just go ahead and put it out there, for the whole world to know, that I idolize Danielle Dax. Were it not for the ocean between us, I might just stalk her in my spare time. Instead, I have to console myself with buying her records whenever they pop up. At this point, I have far too many copies of the “Tomorrow Never Knows” single to be considered competent to stand trial…and I don’t even like that song. I’m not alone in my obsession, however! Even Marc Heal mentioned in a Cubanate interview just how enamored he is with Danielle. I would wager good money that he, too, owns enough duplicates of her records to keep a college town record store open indefinitely.

I chose this first song to post because it gives me a giggle and because it is from the slightly difficult to find “Pop-Eyes” LP. “Here Come The Harvest Buns” and “Bed Caves” are certainly the stand-out tracks from the album, the rest of the record being considerably slower, noisier and generally lyrically stranger (although no less good, mind you!). Danielle Dax has, perhaps, the most abstract lyrical content this side of Cocteau Twins and, while it is always fun to spend an afternoon decoding the meaning, the word sounds serve as just another intricate, meaty layer to her deliciously complex song-writing.

This is a woman who deserves considerably more attention, consideration, and respect. If “Here Come The Harvest Buns” doesn’t do it for you, I’m sure I’ll post more from her in the future. If all else fails, I will beat you over the head with her music until you have no choice but to dance. Go ahead, listen to this track and tell me you didn’t wiggle your butt just a little bit.

LISTEN: Mediafire